Volume 5, Issue 1, June 2019, Page: 19-25
A Case of TASO Tororo Surge Strategy: Using Double Layered Screening to Increase the Rate of Identification of New HIV Positive Clients in the Community
Ronald Opito, Directorate of Program Management and Capacity Development, the Aids Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda
Mastula Nanfuka, Directorate of Program Management and Capacity Development, the Aids Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda
Levicatus Mugenyi, Directorate of Program Management and Capacity Development, the Aids Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda
Michael Bernard Etukoit, Directorate of Program Management and Capacity Development, the Aids Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda
Kenneth Mugisha, Directorate of Program Management and Capacity Development, the Aids Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda
Lynette Opendi, Directorate of Program Management and Capacity Development, the Aids Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda; USAID Regional Health Integration to Enhance Services in Eastern Uganda, IntraHealth International, Mbale, Uganda
Betty Nabukonde, Directorate of Program Management and Capacity Development, the Aids Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda
David Kagimu, Directorate of Program Management and Capacity Development, the Aids Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda
Godfrey Muzaaya, Directorate of Program Management and Capacity Development, the Aids Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda; USAID Regional Health Integration to Enhance Services in Eastern Uganda, IntraHealth International, Mbale, Uganda
Caroline Karutu, USAID Regional Health Integration to Enhance Services in Eastern Uganda, IntraHealth International, Mbale, Uganda
Received: Jan. 5, 2019;       Accepted: Feb. 7, 2019;       Published: Feb. 28, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijhpebs.20190501.13      View  279      Downloads  61
Abstract
Introduction: HIV testing services is the entry point to HIV prevention, care, treatment, and support services. According to Uganda Population HIV impact assessment preliminary report released in 2018, 72.5% of people living with HIV in Uganda knew their status, which is below the UNAIDS target of 90%. We proposed a double layered screening of the population using the Ministry of Health HIV Testing Services (HTS) screening tool to identify more HIV positives and start them on treatment. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the double layered screening approach on HIV test yield. Methods: A double layered screening approach involved using community and technical teams from TASO Tororo HIV clinic through the surge strategy. The community team (first layer) comprised of expert clients, local council 1, market and church leaders who were trained on how to screen the people in the community using the HTS screening tool. The technical team (second layer) comprised of medical personnel and counselors who subjected all people mobilized and screened by the community team to a second layered screening before offering an HIV test. We compared proportions of HIV test yields before and after the implementation of the double layered HTS strategy using proportions test and we assessed the impact of the double layered screening using a difference in difference (DID) evaluation method. Results; There was a general increase in HIV test yield from 4.75% with single screening (period: January-March 2018) to 12.25% with double screening (period: April – June 2018) (P<0.001). The increase was more in males (from 3.51% to 11.06%) than in females (from 6.36% to 13.31%) and this difference was significant (P=0.035). The increase in HIV test yield did not differ by age (P=0.060), by marital status (P=0.606) or by first time tester (P=0.167), Conclusion: The double layered screening before HIV test could be an effective strategy to maximize HIV test yield in the general population, which if scaled up can save huge resources, time and help focus on actual targets for HIV testing services, leading to early attainment of the UNAIDS 1st target of 90-90-90.
Keywords
Uganda, Mass Screening, AIDS, Marital Status, Ambulatory Care Facility, Health Personnel
To cite this article
Ronald Opito, Mastula Nanfuka, Levicatus Mugenyi, Michael Bernard Etukoit, Kenneth Mugisha, Lynette Opendi, Betty Nabukonde, David Kagimu, Godfrey Muzaaya, Caroline Karutu, A Case of TASO Tororo Surge Strategy: Using Double Layered Screening to Increase the Rate of Identification of New HIV Positive Clients in the Community, International Journal of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Education and Behavioural Science. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2019, pp. 19-25. doi: 10.11648/j.ijhpebs.20190501.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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