Volume 5, Issue 2, December 2019, Page: 91-96
Awareness and Behaviours Relating to Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Among Students of Higher Institutions in South West Nigeria
Adeniyi Augustine Adebayo, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Afe Babalola University Ado-Ekiti/Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido Ekiti, Nigeria
Bello Folasade Olanike, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Ibadan/University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria
Adeyemo Olabisi Timothy, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Afe Babalola University Ado-Ekiti/Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido Ekiti, Nigeria
Bakare Adewumi, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Afe Babalola University Ado-Ekiti/Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido Ekiti, Nigeria
Ayankunle Mojisola Olumide, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Afe Babalola University Ado-Ekiti/Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido Ekiti, Nigeria
Agboola Segun Matthew, Department of Family Medicine, Afe Babalola University Ado-Ekiti/Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido Ekiti, Nigeria
Received: Jul. 4, 2019;       Accepted: Jul. 30, 2019;       Published: Aug. 19, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijhpebs.20190502.12      View  115      Downloads  27
Abstract
Background: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) constitute a major health concern worldwide, this is particularly so in the developing and low resource countries and important factor in the prevention and treatment is the awareness and attitudes of the people toward these diseases. Methodology: The study was conducted among the students in higher institutions in Ekiti state using a self-administered questionnaires following a two-stage stratified clustered sampling. Results: A total number of 150 questionnaires were distributed, with a response rate of 90% (135) and an average age of 22.94 years. The males were statistically older than the females (P<0.03). Gonorrhoea, syphilis and HIV enjoyed better awareness compared to other STIs with (95.4%), (79.2%) and (77.7%) respectively with Chlamydia being the least known STI with only 16.2% of the respondents being aware. The male students had a higher incidence of multiple sexual partners than their female counterparts, with the difference being statistically significant both in the last 12 months (37.8% vs. 8.7%, P<0.001) and total numbers of sexual partners ever 54.1% vs. 21.7%, P<0.0001). Majority of respondents (50%) had their sexual debut between 15-20 years but a sizable number had first intercourse below 15 years of age (20%). Eighty-two percent (82%) and 50% of the respondents acknowledge the use of condom for prevention of STI transmission and contraception respectively. Conclusion: The knowledge of the students on STIs is above average except for Chlamydia infection. The practice of the students concerning sexual intercourse and prevention of STIs including HIV is disturbing, especially sexual intercourse and low level of condom use.
Keywords
Sexually Transmitted Infections, Awareness, Prevention
To cite this article
Adeniyi Augustine Adebayo, Bello Folasade Olanike, Adeyemo Olabisi Timothy, Bakare Adewumi, Ayankunle Mojisola Olumide, Agboola Segun Matthew, Awareness and Behaviours Relating to Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Among Students of Higher Institutions in South West Nigeria, International Journal of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Education and Behavioural Science. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2019, pp. 91-96. doi: 10.11648/j.ijhpebs.20190502.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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