Volume 5, Issue 2, December 2019, Page: 97-104
The Efficacy of Anti-Retroviral Therapy on HIV Patients with and Without Tuberculosis: A Comparative Study in a State Hospital Bida Niger State Nigeria
Ebenezer Obi Daniel, Department of Public Health School of Public Health, Texila American University Georgetown, Guyana, South America
Aminat Abiola Ojewale, Department of Public Health School of Public Health, Texila American University Georgetown, Guyana, South America
Paul Olaiya Abiodun, Department of Public Health School of Public Health, Texila American University Georgetown, Guyana, South America
Gabriel Omoniyi Ayeni, Department of Public Health School of Public Health, Texila American University Georgetown, Guyana, South America
Olayinka Victor Ojo, Department of Public Health School of Public Health, Texila American University Georgetown, Guyana, South America
Oladapo Michael Olagbegi, Department of Physiotherapy School of Health Scienczes, University of Kwazulu-Natal Westville Campus, Durban, South Africa
Received: Jul. 22, 2019;       Accepted: Aug. 13, 2019;       Published: Aug. 26, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijhpebs.20190502.13      View  47      Downloads  22
Abstract
There is a general broad knowledge surrounding the possible complications and opportunistic infections that patients with HIV can be exposed to, one of which is Tuberculosis, a popular co-morbid disease in HIV patients. Several studies have unraveled the efficacy of ARVs on the CD4 counts in HIV patients, but there exists knowledge gap in establishing the efficacy of ARV therapy among HIV patients with Tuberculosis (TB). The main objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy on HIV positive patients with and without tuberculosis. A quasi-experimental design was employed in this study. Eighty (80) patients were recruited in total from the ARV-TB clinic of general hospital Bida. Forty (40) HIV patients without TB, and HIV patients with TB were recruited consecutively into group A and B respectively. Each group participants’ baseline CD4 counts were estimated and recorded, after which both groups were subjected to a six weeks ARV therapy. Data were collected weekly (for six weeks) by conducting laboratory test of CD4 counts for both groups’ patients. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 25.0 software. Descriptive statistics of mean, standard deviation and percentages were used to summarize the data, while inferential statistics of t-test, ANOVA, ANCOVA and Bonferoni pairwise comparison were used to test the significant differences as appropriate. Alpha level was set at 0.05. The study revealed that the CD4 count of HIV patients without TB (group A) at baseline was found to be statistically significantly higher than those with TB (group B), and also revealed a statistical significant difference in the CD 4 count across the seven-time-point period of the study (baseline and the six weeks of ARV therapy) in the two groups (P<0.05). The study also revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the CD4 count of groups A and B comparatively after six weeks of ARV therapy. Recommendations among others include; extension of the study tentacle to increased number of health facilities and longer study period, conducting studies on the impact of the dual therapy (ARV and anti-TB) on the co-infected patients, and the need for all stakeholders involved in the treatment of HIV patients to continuously update their knowledge base on the management of the HIV patients with and without TB, for a more productive and goal-oriented treatment outcome, void of sentiments and discrimination.
Keywords
HIV, Tuberculosis, Antiretroviral Therapy
To cite this article
Ebenezer Obi Daniel, Aminat Abiola Ojewale, Paul Olaiya Abiodun, Gabriel Omoniyi Ayeni, Olayinka Victor Ojo, Oladapo Michael Olagbegi, The Efficacy of Anti-Retroviral Therapy on HIV Patients with and Without Tuberculosis: A Comparative Study in a State Hospital Bida Niger State Nigeria, International Journal of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Education and Behavioural Science. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2019, pp. 97-104. doi: 10.11648/j.ijhpebs.20190502.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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