Volume 5, Issue 2, December 2019, Page: 134-140
Influence of Stigma on Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Care Continuum among Men and Transwomen Who Have Sex with Men (MTWSM) in the United States
Jude Ssenyonjo, Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA; Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA
Roman Shrestha, Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA; Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA
Michael Copenhaver, Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA; Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA
Received: Oct. 15, 2019;       Accepted: Nov. 9, 2019;       Published: Nov. 17, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijhpebs.20190502.18      View  25      Downloads  16
Abstract
Despite evidence from recent trials of the efficacy of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in reducing the risk of contracting HIV, PrEP uptake has been slow due to a range of social, structural, and behavioral factors. In this systematic review, we examined the influence of stigma on the PrEP care continuum among men and transwomen who have sex with men (MTWSM). We conducted a literature search in the PubMed electronic database (2012–2018) that focused on the PrEP care continuum among high-risk MTWSM. We explored studies that specifically looked at the influence of stigma on the PrEP cascade among these socially disadvantaged populations. Our search yielded 161 articles, of which nine were ultimately included in our systematic review. The results showed a significant association between stigma and unwillingness to seek or use PrEP suggesting that stigma may negatively affect willingness and uptake of PrEP among these high-risk groups.
Keywords
Men Who Have Sex with Men, Transwomen Stigma, Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, HIV
To cite this article
Jude Ssenyonjo, Roman Shrestha, Michael Copenhaver, Influence of Stigma on Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Care Continuum among Men and Transwomen Who Have Sex with Men (MTWSM) in the United States, International Journal of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Education and Behavioural Science. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2019, pp. 134-140. doi: 10.11648/j.ijhpebs.20190502.18
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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